[PDF] Download ☆ American Dreams | by Ü Sapphire

By Sapphire | Comments: ( 635 ) | Date: ( Nov 14, 2019 )

In the tradition of Alice Walker, this electrifying new African American voice delivers the verdict on the urban condition in a sensual, propulsive, and prophetic book of poetry and prose Whether she is writing about an enraged teenager gone wilding in Central Park, fifteen year old Latasha Harlins gunned down by a Korean grocer, or a brutalized child who grows up to esIn the tradition of Alice Walker, this electrifying new African American voice delivers the verdict on the urban condition in a sensual, propulsive, and prophetic book of poetry and prose Whether she is writing about an enraged teenager gone wilding in Central Park, fifteen year old Latasha Harlins gunned down by a Korean grocer, or a brutalized child who grows up to escape her probable fate through the miracle of art, Sapphire s vision in this collection of poetry and prose is unswervingly honest Stunning One of the strongest debut collections of the 90s Publishers Weekly


  • Title: American Dreams
  • Author: Sapphire
  • ISBN: 9780679767992
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Paperback

About Author:

Sapphire

Ramona Lofton was born in Fort Ord, California, one of four children of an Army couple who relocated within the United States and abroad After a disagreement concerning where the family would settle, her parents separated, with Lofton s mother kind of abandoning them Lofton dropped out of high school, fleeing her abusive father, and moved to San Francisco, where she attained a GED and enrolled at the City College of San Francisco before dropping out to become a hippie In the mid 1970s Lofton attended the City College of New York and obtained a MFA degree at Brooklyn College Lofton held various professions before starting her writing career, working as a performance artist as well as a teacher of reading and writing.Lofton moved to New York City in 1977 and immersed herself in poetry She also became a member of a gay organization named United Lesbians of Color for Change Inc She wrote, performed and eventually published her poetry during the height of the Slam Poetry movement in New York Lofton took the name Sapphire because of its one time cultural association with the image of a belligerent black woman, and also because she said she could easily picture that name on a book cover than her birth name.Sapphire self published the collection of poems Meditations on the Rainbow in 1987 As Cheryl Clarke notes, Sapphire s 1994 book of poems, American Dreams is often erroneously referred to as her first book One critic referred to it as one of the strongest debut collections of the 1990s.Her first novel, Push, was unpublished before being discovered by literary agent Charlotte Sheedy, whose interest created demand and eventually led to a bidding war Sapphire submitted the first 100 pages of Push to a publisher auction in 1995 and the highest bidder offered her 500,000 to finish the novel The book was published in 1996 by Vintage Publishing and has since sold hundreds of thousands of copies Sapphire noted in an interview with William Powers that she noticed Push for sale in one of the Penn Station bookstores, and that moment it struck her she was no longer a creature of the tiny world of art magazines and homeless shelters from which she came The novel brought Sapphire praise and much controversy for its graphic account of a young woman growing up in a cycle of incest and abuse.A film based on her novel premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2009 It was renamed Precious to avoid confusion with the 2009 action film Push The cast included Gabourey Sidibe, Mo Nique, who won the Academy Award for her portrayal of Precious mother Mary, Mariah Carey, and Lenny Kravitz Sapphire herself appears briefly in the film as a daycare worker.Sapphire s writing was the subject of an academic symposium at Arizona State University in 2007 In 2009 she was the recipient of a Fellow Award in Literature from United States Artists.Sapphire currently lives and works in New York City.



Comments American Dreams

  • Jesika

    It was so disturbing. Definitely not for the faint of heart or for people who can't handle explicit sexual language. I guess I would say to read this because you should know of the sour to appreciate the sweet.


  • Chris

    This is a good collection of stories and poems, which I had ther fortune of seeing Sapphire read most of when I was a senior at NYU. She has one of the most powerful slam styles, almost making me believe I like slam poetry.


  • C

    My favorite poet.


  • Powerhouse

    this woman never ceases to amaze me. this is powerhouse writing in my book.


  • Jessi MotherFucking Ross

    my favourite book for poetry


  • Billie Rain

    this book convinced me that my words are not too ugly to be beautiful.


  • Lee Foust

    This is a terrific collection of poems, stories, and performance pieces. While the core emotion from which these texts of incest, trauma, rape, sex work, and recovery come is more than enough to draw a reader in and hold them riveted, Sapphire also proves herself a consummate artist in this collection. Having seen her perform and read her texts a few times back in NYC in the '90s, I was happy to come across this collection over the summer in a second hand shop, and to finally take the time to re [...]


  • Bry

    no words can describe the PAIN of an adult who was MOLESTED as a child, however SAPPHIRE [Poetess extraordinaire:] manages to creatively find those words, and clues us all in and in turn, we are all somehow made better because of such bravery. such humanness. and such talent.


  • Jenni

    Edgy, spoken-word type pieces. Probably come to life when performed.


  • Caprishacoleman

    good very graphic but good


  • Regina

    In American Dreams, Sapphire creates raw graphic poetry that gets under your skin and makes you realize how difficult the plight of young people can be. I found it hard to separate the story in the poem from the devices the writer used to tell the poem. If you read the poems in chronological order you can see a character narrator developing that is showing how people go from early childhood sex abuse to continue to be objectified by men. She talks of stripping, drug use and prostitution. The pro [...]


  • Kenya Wright

    Hard core. Raw with no chaser.Although I do recommend drinking while reading this. There's some tough topics dealing with molestation and sexual abuse.Yet, there are some tough lines that are spun so beautifully.


  • Elizabeth

    To be honest, I didn't even know WHAT I was reading or what it meant most of this book. All I did know was that whatever she was saying, she felt it literally from the deepest part of her core. This book is just filled with emotion, real life emotion. It's told in "short stories", and I think each one was supposed to have a deeper meaner, but I really couldn't even tell a difference among ANY of the characters. Male or female, the characters just suffered, and it was heartbreaking yet moving as [...]


  • Alex

    I love Sapphire for her real and raw honesty. With that said, the truth can be hard to listen to at times. It took me a while to read it, because at times, I just had to put it down and come back to it because of the emotional overload. I found the overall tone of the book to change constantly between sad and triumphant. Sapphire speaks for those who are unspoken for. I'll always love her books simply for exposing the truth about the things the we don't like to talk about in mainstream culture a [...]


  • Angélique (Angel)

    This collection gets four stars not because I enjoyed it but rather because I found it exceptionally necessary. Sapphire's writing is brutal, harrowing, and unequivocally real. She sugarcoats nothing, imbuing her work with all the anger and ugliness that the situations possess when experienced in real life. At the same time, she manages to write of horrible and traumatic experiences in sometimes beautiful ways which makes the ugliness of the situations cut more sharply. I believe this collection [...]


  • Kelly

    I don't know why I had not read this collection sooner. I loved the author's book Push (but was upset with The Kid, the sequel to Push). This book killed me. Really killed me. I read it, then reread it, and still I waited to write a review. Prose and poetry, the book is over 20 years old, but sadly, its message (the treatment of women, particularly sexual abuse, prostitution, moms and daughters, and violence) is still relevant today. This is not an easy collection to read, and it's certainly not [...]


  • Bill Littell

    To quote the St. Louis Post Dispatch, "This collection of prose and poems will rattle your bones and rock your soulHer uncompromising voice is one we seldom hear." The racism, sexual violence, and anger depicted in this collection make it unsuitable for young readers its in-your-face honesty, passion, and pain make it a must read for anyone interested in understanding the harsh reality lived by too many in American society.


  • Ashley Pearson

    This book of poetry and prose is extremely raw and painful, but also very well written and like a snapshot of the thought process of many who have suffered abuse and oppression. Sapphire is very gifted, but if Push was not for the squeamish, then American Dreams is for those with a really strong stomach. A hard read, but very powerful and moving.


  • Izah Ahmad

    Not for a soft-heart because too much disturbing explicits in it till you can't cope reading it anymore, but then what do you expect from Sapphire herself?Will do finish it, but for now, American Dreams shall be put down for a while.


  • Sylvia McIvers

    This book is a bit out of my usual reading list, but it was good.The rage in some of the poetry and prose jumps off the page, and so does the need to be loved.Why do people we love treat us so badly? Why do strangers treat us badly?Be strong, be strong, and be stronger yet.


  • Aiesha

    Dark, raw, vulnerable and real. This book evoked every emotion from fear, pain, anger to small moments of joy. It was visceral in a way that helps you think more critically about yourself and the world we live in. Nothing is gratuitous.


  • Camille Chidsey

    Raw, disturbing, and incredibly powerful read. Probably should not have read it in one sitting - it was painful and uncomfortable at times, but an equally compelling read. Not for the faint of heart.


  • Cassie

    I didn't like this at all. I had to read it for a college English course and it was depressing and dark. It's not supposed to be all roses and sunshine but that doesn't change the fact that I didn't like. Maybe it's literal genius but it didn't speak to me.


  • Kaia

    For class, again.


  • Jacqueline Nicole Harris

    Her poetry cuts like a knife. I loved it.


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  • [PDF] Download ☆ American Dreams | by Ü Sapphire
    143 Sapphire
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ American Dreams | by Ü Sapphire
    Posted by:Sapphire
    Published :2019-06-18T14:40:09+00:00